parallax background

Technologies Ready to Scale

Technology development and deployment is facilitated in close partnership with end users and stakeholders in the food system to meet identified demands and foster a continual feedback and improvement process.


Ready-to-scale technologies moved through a phased process from ideation, field testing, piloting, documentation, and official release in-country. These technologies are scaled through multiple private and public networks.

IN-COUNTRY CONTACT:
Dr. Getachew Ayana
Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR)
Melkassa Agricultural Research Center (MARC)
Adama, Ethiopia
Email: getachew_ayana@yahoo.com

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR:
Dr. Tesfaye Mengiste
Purdue University
Email: tmengist@purdue.edu

For Merera sorghum seed availability, please contact:

Bako Agricultural Research Center
Chemeda Birhanu
Phone: +251 91393645 or +251 917736746
Email: chemedabirhanu@gmail.com

Oromia Agricultural Research Institute
Teshome Bogale
Phone: +251 911388166
Email: teshe_2008@yahoo.com
 

“Merera” is an improved disease-resistant sorghum variety with up to 43% yield gain for higher rainfall zones in western Ethiopia. Our global team successfully identified two key genes that carry anthracnose resistance in sorghum, enabling targeted breeding of disease resistance into locally adapted farmer-preferred sorghums for use by smallholder farmers and scaling in the region.

 
 
 
 
 




PEARL MILLET AND SORGHUM SEED BALLS WITH 30% AVERAGE YIELD GAIN

CROP: Pearl Millet and Sorghum
TARGET COUNTRIES: West Africa

IN-COUNTRY CONTACTS and CO-PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS:

Dr. Hannatou Moussa Oumarou

INRAN
Maradi, Niger
Email: hannaemoussa@yahoo.com

Dr. Ali Aminou

FUMA Gaskiya Farmer Association
Maradi, Niger
Email: fumagaskiya@gmail.com

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR:

Dr. Ludger Herrmann

University of Hohenheim
Email: ludger.herrmann@uni-hohenheim.de

CO-PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR:

Dr. Charles Nwankwo

University of Hohenheim
Email: charsile2000@yahoo.com

For more information:

https://seedball.uni-hohenheim.de

Technologies Ready to Scale
 

Seed balls are produced at home with local materials that provide a 30% average yield gain while also empowering women to dry seed their fields before the intense planting season around rainfall events. Seed balls are a sowing technique for semi-arid areas, especially aimed at the improvement of plant establishment with dry sowing. Seed balls represent a mixture of soil material, seeds and additives (e.g., nutrients, pesticides). They aim at small-grain cereal cropping systems with wide spacing (seed pockets).

 
 




Technologies Ready to Scale
 

Parasitoid wasps are naturally occurring predatory (non-stinging) wasps that can be reared at the household level and strategically deployed against the millet head miner pest to protect fields of millet, allowing for up to a 34% yield gain. Parasitoid wasps (Habrobracon hebetor) are reared in small jute bags with a mixture of millet and cowpea, allowing offspring to emerge from these rearing bags and disperse to millet fields to control millet head miner insects. A set of 15 bags yield an inoculate population of circa 1,000 parasitoids and successive generations will disperse. This provides coverage of up to 3 square kilometers and provides up to 34% yield gain, compared to unprotected fields of pearl millet.

 
 




EASY TO PREPARE SORGHUM AND MILLET FOOD PRODUCTS

CROP: Sorghum & Pearl Millet
TARGET COUNTRIES: West Africa

IN-COUNTRY CONTACTS:
Dr. Cheikh Ndiaye
ITA
Dakar, Senegal
Email: chndiaye@ita.sn

Dr. Moustapha Moussa
INRAN
Niamey, Niger
Email: moustimou@yahoo.fr

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR:
Dr. Bruce Hamaker
Purdue University
Email: hamakerb@purdue.edu
Technologies Ready to Scale
 

Food product recipes, processing techniques, and training to allow women entrepreneurs to produce and market easy-to-prepare traditional food products for the modern food table. Building greater demand for locally produced grains to provide more reliable income for West African smallholder farmers and creation of entrepreneurial opportunities and networks for women and youth.

 

IN-COUNTRY CONTACT:
Dr. Kebede Abegaz
Hawassa University
Hawassa, Ethiopia
Email: abegaz2005@yahoo.co.uk

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR:
Dr. Joseph Awika
Texas A&M University
Email: awika@tamu.edu
 

Unique highly digestible (IHD) sorghum lines that have improved performance in food processing and allow for sorghum-based injera production are being introduced. Reduced input cost using IHD sorghum and teff flour mixes for injera production compared with 100% teff injera will give female injera producers added income. Other recipes and milling techniques to support sorghum-based food products from locally available sorghum are being developed.

 




 

A white sorghum hybrid ESH 5 officially registered with up to 15% yield gain (5.76 t/ha yield performance) for use in lowland-growing areas of Ethiopia with good injera-making properties.

 
 

Official registration of RTx3410 through RTx3428 sorghum germplasm in the United States that can provide seed companies parent lines to develop sugarcane aphid-resistant seed for marketing. A dynamic team over time successfully identified key sugarcane aphid-resistant materials and germplasm through global collaborations.

  • Dr. Abadi Gebre Mezgebe
    One problem we are trying to solve through our partnership with SMIL is a lack of milling technology for sorghum. If we maximize milling technology, we can increase the good functional food products at the market.
    Dr. Abadi Gebre Mezgebe
    SMIL Researcher
  • Dr. Hannatou Moussa Oumaro
    The seed ball is a solution for a farmer's problem. Seed balls are very important to farmers. In the Sahel, we are facing climate change. We have a soil fertility problem and financial problems with our farmers. Farmers lack food and they don't have enough resources to buy inputs, like fertilizer. Seed balls and the materials they are using are low cost. They don't need to go far to get them. The seed balls are made from  sand or clay, wood ash, and just a small seed with fertilizer. They solve the financial problem and help soil fertility since farmers don't have money to afford all the types of fertilizer.
    Dr. Hannatou Moussa Oumaro
    Researcher at National Institute of Agronomic Research of Niger (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique du Niger - INRAN)